Smart Guns: Future For The police?

Smart Guns: Future For The police?

In the wake of recent shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the public is once again worried about the use of excessive force by the police. This is where Yardam Technologies comes in.

Yardam Technologies, from Santa Cruz, California, is working on a tracking device for police guns. The device will be small enough to fit in the handle and will provide information on the gun via bluetooth to the officer’s smartphone, and also to Yardam’s servers in Washington and Texas. Current info that the device can provide is gun’s location, if it is holstered, loaded, fired or not.

“It’s the same kind of sensor your iPhone uses to change the screen from vertical to horizontal when you turn the phone to the side,” Yardam spokesman Jim Schaff told The Huffington Post, “but ours is way more powerful.”

The company is working on a possibility of showing if the gun is being pointed at someone, as well as building a framework allowing departments to decide when the alert is received. Yardam hopes that this data will provide support for field officers, such as alerting them to potentially dangerous situations, however, it will also serve as a way of analyzing any incidents, providing enough information to more clearly weigh an actual shooting situation.

The trend of gadgets that monitor or record is nothing new. Dash cams are already used in several states and some states are actually requiring body cams to be worn by officers. The results of the body cam show that cops are less likely to use force, while the civilians are less likely to complain. This might be a safety-improving technology for everyone.

As far as Yardam is concerned, their initial aim was to sell this product in the consumer market, to alert gun owners whether their weapon is stolen or to help locating it. It would appear that the interest is higher with police departments and Yardam quickly changed their focus point. The company has raised $1.5 million so far and is still unable to produce high volumes of their product. Yardam spokesman says he is hopeful it will reach necessary volumes by next year.

Image courtesy of: http://www.forbes.com/